Opening a New Book; Opening Kids’ Minds to New Foods

July 05, 2010

Two_eggs_please


By Mark Bishop, Deputy Director

At the
library the other week, my son Henry told me that he wanted to bring home
the book Two Eggs Please. It's a
beautifully illustrated book by the same artist who wrote one of my
favorite children's books, Click Clack Moo

The
story is a simple one: various animals approach a diner and order two
eggs in various manners — over easy, scrambled, poached — all different, but the same.

For the record, Henry hasn't
ever like eggs other than hard-boiled egg whites, but that didn't
affect his excitement for this book — he loved it! It kept him
mesmerized at bedtime for two weeks straight.

But here's what fascinated
me: the morning after the first two evenings of reading Two Eggs, he
came downstairs and said to me, “Can I have two eggs?” And he asked for
one scrambled and one sunny side up. And he ate them both! Now he loves
eggs.

What stood out to me about this experience was the impact of bringing good nutrition messages into our everyday conversations and activities. I love hearing stories about teachers who make small changes to integrate healthy eating messages into their classroom, like the teacher who created her own math cards so that students were counting apples instead of pizza slices. We can mix in books about gardening, health,
food, the environment. . . kids soak it up. The result is not always as obvious as
in this case, but the impact is there nonetheless. The experiences we create for our kids help
shape their habits and open their minds to new (healthy) possibilities. 

And if anyone out
there has suggestions for a healthy food reading list for toddlers,
please let us know!