Physical Activity Boost: Cone Drills

July 20, 2012

By Lizzy Parker, HSC communications intern

Lizzy Parker is a rising junior at Colorado College with a passion for health and fitness. In January of 2012, she became a Certified Personal Trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. As an intern at HSC this summer, she looks forward to sharing her enthusiasm for and knowledge about physical activity—and, that it can be fun!

Go For The Gold Outdoor Games_20If you are looking forward to getting in some exercise this weekend, consider making it a family affair with cone drills — these can be as fun, silly, serious or intensive as you make them! 

First, find a large, open space. That may be your front yard, a nearby park, or an open soccer field. Set up at least six cones (or shoes—whatever is available to you) about 4-6 yards apart in a straight line. Between each cone you will perform an exercise.

Here is a sample workout. Feel free to add in your own moves or invite your kids to come up with fun ideas!   

  • High knees from the first to the second cone;
  • Perform walking lunges from second to third cone (be aware not to let the front knee go past your toes);
  • Side shuffle from third to fourth cone;
  • Leap (reach those toes!) from fourth to fifth cone;
  • Skip from fifth to sixth cone;
  • Finally, back pedal (that’s reverse running—watch where you’re going) all the way back to the first cone. 

To make more of a game out of it, split up into two teams and relay to the finish. Each person should go at least three times. This is an activity that can be enjoyed at nearly all ages, so invite other families to join in on the fun. There’s nothing like a little friendly competition to motivate you to move. 

**Remember: It is easy to get caught up in the excitement, but there is no need to sacrifice form, especially when doing exercises such as walking lunges. Be sure to establish this rule so everyone can stay healthy and injury-free for the next game. If this becomes a problem, eliminate those moves and add different ones. Physical activity is meant to be beneficial, not cause for injury. As always, listen to your body. If something is painful, don’t do it. However, if you are feeling a (good) burn, keep going and challenge those muscles to keep going!

Disclaimer: The recommendations on this blog are not meant to be a substitute for recommendations from your physician. Take care to consult with your physician if you have questions or concerns about beginning a new exercise regimen. As always, if something hurts, don’t do it. Know your body’s limits and refrain for pushing yourself too far, too fast.